Sjoe!!

Ek het meer as sestig jaar gewag vir hierdie dag. Toe gebeur dit op Woensdagmiddag 13 November 2019 in die Sabi-Sandreservaat…IMG_0265

Ongelukkig was sy kop in ‘n bos weggesteek, maar ek kon saggies oor sy skubbe streel..IMG_0284

en my verwonder aan die fluweelagtige tekstuur, al is dit hard…IMG_0266

Die skropmerke, waar hy pas tevore vir insekte gegrawe het, wys spore van skerp kloue…IMG_0270

‘n Ogie loer onder die bos uit na my en dalk besluit hy om homself in ‘n bolletjie op te rol…IMG_0273

Ietermagô (Pangolin) besluit hy wandel verder op sy etensuur…IMG_0359

So skaars soos hoendertande en wie moet ons bedank?IMG_0351

Die sotte wat handel dryf in hierdie onskuldige diere. Die skubbe wat hulle teen predatore moet beskerm, is ironies genoeg juis waarvoor hulle so meedoënloos gejag word…IMG_0340

Die skubbe word gebruik in tradisionele Asiese medisyne, veral in Sjina en Viëtnam. Daar word geglo dat dit sekere siektes kan genees. Die vleis is ook ‘n lekkerny en ornamente word gemaak van die skubbe. Die skubbe bestaan uit keratien, dieselfde stoffasie as naels en hare van die mens en besit geen medisinale waarde nie! Dis dieselfde as waarvan renosterhoring gemaak is…hoe dom en onnosel kan mense nog wees?

Die Ietermagô is die dier waarmee die meeste handel gedryf word en hulle getalle het onrusbarend afgeneem en hulle sal heel waarskynlik binnekort uitgewis wees!

My hart bloei vir hierdie onskuldige diertjies en dis seker die eerste en laaste keer wat ek die voorreg sal hê om een te sien.

 

107 Replies to “Sjoe!!”

        1. Juis toe ons verlede week daar was, was daar ‘n poging tot stropery. Die bliksems het twee-uur in die nag die drade geknip. Gelukkig het die alarm afgegaan en kon die sekuriteitsmense presies sien waar hulle ingekom het. Deesdae is die tegnologie van so ‘n aard dat dit reeds baie help. Twee dae lank is hul spore gevolg met honde en voetsoldate, asook ‘n helikopter. Terwyl ons daar was, moes ons uit sekere gebiede wegbly, want hulle is swaar gewapen. Ons het nie die uiteinde van die storie gehoor nie, maar ek hoop hulle het gevrek van hitte en ontbering!!

          Liked by 1 person

  1. OMG! A pangolin! I’ve never seen one in the wild. I have an old West African granary door carved with a pangolin motif… but never saw one. You are extremely lucky Dina. 🙂
    When I think they’re hunted for their scales, which do zip, medicine-wise… Grrr.
    Could I use one or the other of your photos in a post, with all due credit of course?
    Astublift? AUB? AUB? 😉

    Liked by 1 person

    1. I am so sad about what is happening with pangolins.There are gruesome stories about how they are kept captive to stay “fresh” and to be killed later… uggh I don’t even want to know about it!
      Of course you can use my photo’s. I’ll be honoured!

      Liked by 1 person

      1. Dankje wel Sis. I will definitely use it. With all due credit of course. I just did some research on the pangolin massacre. A bl..dy shame. At least you were very lucky to see one so close. Where was that? Oh. One more thing: do you still have hartebeest in SA?

        Liked by 1 person

        1. I saw it in the Sabi-Sand Reserve which is ajacent to Kruger National Park.There are no fence lines between the parks so the animals can roam freely across huge areas.
          Yes there are lots of Red Hartebeest as well as Lichtenstein-hartebeest and Tsessebe.

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        2. No fence is actually the way it should be. So animals can move freely. But maybe the fence would be to keep humans (poachers) getting in?
          I will have to check the Lichtenstein hartebeest. I know them as kongoni the Swahili name. I guess Tsessebe is Zulu or Xhosa?

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        3. The fences are on the outskirts of the reserves.The inside fences have been taken down, so the the reserves are all integrated and it creates huge living space for animals.
          Last week when we were there, there was a breach in the fence line 2 o’clock at night and the anti poaching unit with dogs and helicopter went after the buggers for two days.We left then so I don’t know if they were caught.

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        4. The huge living space is great but the poachers… (I was gonna say “should be shot on sight” but that would not be very Politically Correct would it?) (You can delete that comment if you wish…) 😉

          Liked by 1 person

        5. I will not delete that comment, because that is exactly how we all feel! The poacher are becoming more brutal, have AK47 weapons, and will not hesitate to shoot innocent people who come across them. It is a war out there.It is actually very scary!

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        6. I just realize we all have our wars. (Which Europeans don’t understand) Yours is against poachers. Ours is against narcs. In fact there is a World War against mafias. Only the West and the North don’r know… 😦

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        7. Sounds like Mexico. You do have cheetahs as an added bonus. 🙂
          (More seriously, I don’t see how your country – or the one I live in – can get over this situation… TBH, I’m moving investments around to buy a small house in the South of France as a back-up option…)

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        8. No news about Namibia. The so called buyers are still kicking tyres. They hum and ho and suggest all kinds of payments to move into our house. Hubby says he doesn’t trust them,so we put the house on the market again.

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        9. I’m afraid you will have to grease some palms. Sorry about that.
          From what I saw of the house, it’s gorgeous, but maintenance must be high, especially when you can only live there a limited time…

          Liked by 1 person

        10. No palm greasing here. We are fed up with this kind of behaviour. We did not grow up like that.Corruption is like a disease spreading over this whole region.
          It is a gorgeous house. We used it a lot as a family, but with my children leaving, two of us remain and it is too expensive to maintain.

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        11. What can I say? I’ve lived in Mexico for 30 years. It is probably one of the 10 most corrupt countries in the world. (And there is tough competition) I’m proud to say that in the 25 years I had my company I never paid a bribe. But… if Namibia is a fall-back option… maybe an exception can be made for the residency? We’re talking personal security here.
          Now the house? I didn’t realize you’d had it for a while. You’re right. Let’s be practical. A smaller thing will do.
          Best wishes Sis.

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        12. LOL. You (and I) are probably the last one to have animal books. I do have many animal books from when we were in East Africa. I also have a complete 24 volume Animal Encyclopedia. And my wife makes fun of me because I read it from A to Z… Compliments on your sources.

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        13. I still love my books…it becomes very personal. Sometimes I write in them, where I had sightings or interesting happenings…like a diary.The whole library goes along when we go out into nature…birds, mammals, trees, stars, insects, reptiles, raptors, frogs, tracks, flowers…a box full! Much better than Google. Anyway, most places where we go, do not have cellphone reception.

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        14. I understand totally. Not like you can check the species on your cell in the middle of the bush. I like the idea that you carry a box full of reference wildlife books. Very neat. Now plants and flowers? That is huge. I understand there is an app where you can check the picture of a plant and it scans it and tells you what it is… Don’t remember the name.
          And tracks too… Wow. You’re a real “Bush tracker”

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        15. I saw that app for plant identification.I am not there yet.One small step at a time☺️
          Because we are mostly on an open vehicle in the bush, with an experienced tracker on the bonnet, it is lots of fun learning the tracks.

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        16. A tracker on the bonnet? My, my? How so very vintage. 😉 And yes I can imagine the fun of learning tracks. If you have the app, your mind won’t memorize it. Because it knows it’s in the box.
          (I actually stopped taking photos for a good 10-15 years, because I realized I remembered things better when I had no photographs of the places or events.)

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        17. There is a special seat on the bonnet for the tracker… actually more on the front next to the bonnet.There he has a bird’s eye view.These trackers are amazing.There is a tracker academy as well, where young people are taught to read the bush as their forefathers did. I just love it!!

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        18. I was thinking that to sit on the bonnet would be very dangerous, but a special seat makes sense. Now an academy of trackers? How wonderful. A combination of ancient wisdom and modernity. Compliments. (Do you speak any African language? Zulu, xhosa? Like I spoke Swahili in East Africa.)

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        19. I know a few words here and there, but it is very difficult with all the different languages that are spoken here. Afrikaans is also an African language although its roots lie in Europe.It has influence from the Khoi-San and Malayan languages as well.It is a living language and we take pride in creating new words all the time.Actually a very interesting phenomenon.☺️

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        20. True. My apology about Afrikaans. It is actually probably older than Swahili! Which really was the language of the Arabic and coast slave traders in the 18th century.
          Now Malay? How come? (I have learned a few words of Malay when we went 2 years ago. A pretty language.)
          Toz ziens Sis.

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        21. The Netherlands company, Vereenigde Oostindische Compagnie (VOC) was the biggest trading company in the world by 1650. They traded with India, Malaysia and Indonesia. They put up a halfway station on the southern tip of Africa in 1652.( Cape Town today). Slaves were imported from Africa, Madagascar, India an Indonesia. So you can imagine that there was a lot of influences language wise. Germans and French also came along later and Afrikaans developed out of all these influences.

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        22. Of course. That’s the connection. I keep forgetting the Dutch had quite an “empire” in Asia. Indonesia was a pearl of the Dutch crown. And many Malay words come from European languages. Terima kasih (dankje wel) for the explanation.

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  2. Ai Dina, ek is so bly vir jou part! En natuurlik ook groen van jaloesie, maar dit daar gelaat… Wat n wonderlike voorreg om n ietermagog te sien. Ons jammerlike mensgeslag moet ons kop in skaamte laat sak vir die maniere waarop ons die natuur verkrag.

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  3. To see this extremely endangered species is really a privilege! Thank you for showing the pictures. When the pangolin feels threatened it rolls up like a circle. This is very interesting to see!
    Why don’t people just eat their hair? Instead they have to kill! Totally crazy!

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